London

London

London is situated in south-eastern England, dissected by the River Thames some 50 miles (80 km) upstream from its estuary on the North Sea.  The principal ring highway (the M25 motorway) runs around it at a radius of about 20 miles (30 km) from the city centre.

The growth of Londonwas halted by strict town planning controls in the mid-1950s. 

Its physical limits more or less correspond to the officialboundaries separating the metropolitan county of Greater London from the “home counties” of Kent, Surrey, and Berkshire to the south of the river and Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, and Essex to the north. 

The metropolitan county of Greater London, was formed in 1965. 

Most of Greater London south of the Thames belongs to the historic county of Surrey, while most of Greater London north of the Thames belongs historically to the county of Middlesex.

London is the smallest city (by size) in England and it’s regarded as a forest

The area known as London is really called ‘Greater London’.

The City of London itself is a small portion of this sprawling metropolis. It has a population of only 9,123 people, making it the smallest in England. It’s hard to grasp unless you’ve visited, but the amount of greenery and green space you can enjoy in London is enormous. So much so, in fact, that the density of trees it has per square mile qualifies it as a forest as per the United Nations definition.

Climate

London’s climate is an equable climate in keeping with that of South East England, with mild winters and temperate summers. The average daytime air temperature is 52 °F (11 °C), with 42 °F (5.5 °C) in January and 65 °F (18 °C) in July. Statistics show that the sun shines, however briefly, on five days out of six. 

Londoners shed their winter overcoats in April or May and begin to dress warmly again in late October. The prevailing wind is west-southwest. Because of the sheltering effect of the Chiltern Hills and North Downs, the city has slightly less rainfall than the Home Counties. In an average year one can expect 200 dry days out of 365 and a precipitation total of about 23 inches (585 mm) evenly distributed across the 12 months.

The incidence of sleet and snow is less predictable. It varies greatly from year to year around a long-run statistical average of 20 days.

The capital is thought to be a rainy city. It’s not true at all. London actually sees less rain than Rome, Miami, and Sydney both in terms of volume and number of rainy days.

Property

The price of land in London is excessively high due to it being an ideal place to work and live, particularly if you want to work in economics or other well-paying jobs. This increases the demand for housing which in turn increases the price of land.

How to Rent In London | Top Tips

  • Move Fast. You probably know this already, but nice flats in London go quickly
  • Don’t Rely On The Internet.
  • Be Nice To Your Estate Agent.
  • Use Your Estate Agent’s Personal Phone Number.
  • Don’t Be Afraid To Make An Offer.
  • Don’t be afraid to make a decision.

For the best and most used property search engine for buy and renting property use Rightmove. You can search properly throughout the UK.

London is the financial capital of the world ​

London is an expensive place to live and one of the main reasons is because it is the financial capital of the world. Its markets capture both Western and Eastern time-zones which allows it to gain capital faster than other countries in the world.                                                                                                                                                                          

London will continue to be the financial capital due to the UK offering a far superior university education in economics and finance. 

The UK attracts students from all over the world to study economics. London then employs many of them meaning that many of the best economists continue to live in the UK.

London, city, capital of the United Kingdom.

It is among the oldest of the world’s great cities—its history spanning nearly two millennia—and one of the most cosmopolitan. By far Britain’s largest metropolis, it is also the country’s economic, transportation, and cultural centre.

Working in Central London

Luckily, the job market in London is huge. With opportunities spanning a myriad of industries and job roles, it can seem easy to find a position that’s a perfect fit, however competition can also be stiff. So how do you get your foot in the door?

The giant UK city boasts businesses in every sector imaginable. While jobs can be found in many industries, it’s important to consider whether yours is prevalent in the city…This is beneficial in order to properly assess the likelihood of finding a position that will match your career goals and skill set.

While other industries are quickly on the rise, the most prevalent industry is (and historically has been) the financial sector. From banking, to underwriting and trading, the financial industry operates from the city of London, or “the square mile.” More than 400,000 people work in the city every day, and that number is continuously growing.

Other large industries in the bustling UK city include fashion, tech, private healthcare, media, pharmaceuticals, retail, tourism, legal, property and manufacturing. In any of these fields, there are a multitude of opportunities available to prospective Londoners.

Preparing a great CV

The job market in London is huge but so is the candidate pool. In order make sure you stand out you’re going to need to craft an excellent CV. Use TopCV to build you CV, they are 1 of the best in the industry. Also make sure that your LinkedIn profile is up to date.

While CVs in London are a similar format to the ones used in many countries, it can be helpful to use a London-based service to help tailor it to businesses in the city. 

There are many CV consultancies around London, and most of them will help with your resume online. Some well-reviewed options include Career Consultants and The CV Centre.  

It’s important to note that in Britain it’s unusual to submit a “resume,” so titling your document “CV” tends to be a better idea. While at some point in history there was a difference between a CV and resume, today there’s really no differentiation. You can feel free to only adjust your document’s title.

Prepare for your interview

Interviewing in London may feel a lot like interviewing in any major economy. There aren’t significant differences in customs or cultural norms. Your interviewer will expect you to be on time and well prepared with plenty of background knowledge on the company, the role, and the industry as a whole.

Interviewing in London may feel a lot like interviewing in any major economy. There aren’t significant differences in customs or cultural norms. Your interviewer will expect you to be on time and well prepared with plenty of background knowledge on the company, the role, and the industry as a whole.

One key difference, especially for women, is the dress code…In London it’s more typical to dress in  business clothes. Like any interview practice, this isn’t universal. Don’t hesitate to ask your contact ahead of time about the dress code.

One key difference, especially for women, is the dress code…In London it’s more typical to dress in  business clothes. Like any interview practice, this isn’t universal. Don’t hesitate to ask your contact ahead of time about the dress code.